Making A Run

Montague Dawson (1895 - 1973)

Oil on Canvas
Signed
Size (inches): 11 (h) x 14 (w) inches
Size (cm): 27.9 (h) x 35.6 (w) cm
Available

Montague Dawson RSMA, FRSA (1895–1973) was a British painter who was renowned as a maritime artist. His most famous paintings depict sailing ships, usually clippers or warships of the 18th and 19th centuries. He was the son of a keen yachtsman and the grandson of the marine painter Henry Dawson (1811-1878), born in Chiswick, London. Much of his childhood was spent on Southampton Water where he was able to indulge his interest in the study of ships. For a brief period around 1910 Dawson worked for a commercial art studio in Bedford Row, London, but with the outbreak of the First World War he joined the Royal Navy. Whilst serving with the Navy in Falmouth he met Charles Napier Hemy (1841–1917), who considerably influenced his work. Towards the end of the War Dawson was serving as a Lieutenant RNVR in the Dazzle Painting Section at Leith.[1] In 1924 Dawson was the official artist for an Expedition to the South Seas by the steam yacht St.George. During the expedition he provided illustrated reports to the Graphic magazine. During these years his artwork was also published in the newspaper The Sphere. His works are featured in the Royal Naval Museum and the National Maritime Museum. Dawson was present at the final surrender of the German High Seas Fleet and many of his illustrations depicting the event were published in The Sphere. Dawson is noted for the strict accuracy in the nautical detail of his paintings.

 

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